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ENG| Shelf Stable sausages in a jar

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    ENG| Shelf Stable sausages in a jar

    Dear colleagues,
    I have been reading this forum through translation for a few days now and I am very happy with information I found already. Unfortunately, not everything is understandable through automatic translation and my only hope is to ask all the professional here to switch to English for a few minutes to help a fellow meat products enthusiast. I know that almost everybody in Germany speaks some level of English, so I hope it will not be too much trouble.
    My question is regarding shelf stable glass jars with sausages. My ultimate goal is to get at least 3 month shelf life wiener, knacker, frankfurter and so on. By shelf stable I mean +21-+25C and with store lights on. As you can understand from these requirements, my interest is commercial application for these sausages.
    I'm in sausage production business for 30 years, but never had any experience with long shelf life or storing sausages in a room temperature. Last few weeks influenced by Meica and other companies I am doing a research in this topic trying to bring similar product to people in my country (where most European products including sausages are prohibited).
    I've tested different temperature settings, broth variants and sausage compositions, and already ruined a good amount of sausages to the bacteria, but with every try and new information I get closer to the goal.
    Right now I am looking at two variants of preparation - tyndallization and sterilization. At the moment my tyndallization jars are 24 hours and counting in +37C to check if anything will sprout. I will be leaving them at these conditions for a week, checking every day. Tyndallization was done in 3 heating steps up to 85 degrees each time and 24 days apart. Between these heating jars were in +37 for spores to develop. I believe, these are correct measurements for tyndallization, but we will see in a week.
    Parallel to tyndallization we are modifying autoclave to try sterilization, but we can not check temperature in the core of product as there is no quick way to modify it for that. We will be eyeballing it for now. Previous takes with sterilization were not successful as sausages exploded. Hopefully autoclave will help with that
    My question for my fellow meat enthusiasts is to help me to see mistakes I am making and what information am I missing. Again the goal is regular sausages (german recipes with nitrites) in a transparent glass jar with water (also added nitrites) stable at room temperatures for 2,3,6 months.
    I've been to Germany dozens of times in my lifetime and was always fascinated with products like Meica's jarred sausages. I guess it is doable.
    Hope to hear from all of you soon! cheers!
    p.s. if for some reason you do not feel comfortable writing in English, please feel free to respond in German. Struggling with translations are better that not to have an answer.

    #2
    Hey Fanta57,
    I think, you don't reach a really self stable produkt without sterilisation. Please look to the Hurdles-Concept from Prof. Leistner from MRI Kulmbach.
    On 85°C you don't kill all spores. You need more than 105°C, better 121°C. For sausages you have only heat as a functional hurdles.
    You don't can be sure, that the costumers handles your products carefully. If you heat your products only on 85°C, that will be function about 3 or 5 times, but the risc is high, that the MO bazillus botulinum is growing up.
    Liebe Grüße

    Jürgen Huber
    Huber Consult e.K.

    Metzgermeister,
    Betriebswirt d. Hdw.
    staatl. gepr. Fleischtechniker
    REFA-Prozessorganisator
    Unternehmercoach
    Fachberater für die Fleischwirtschaft

    www.fleischer-beratung.de

    Kommentar


      #3
      Hello and thank you for your response.

      Zitat von Jürgen Huber Beitrag anzeigen
      On 85°C you don't kill all spores. You need more than 105°C, better 121°C. For sausages you have only heat as a functional hurdles.
      Thank you for the suggestion of the book I am familiar with the work and I saw it being cited before, but never read the actual work. But to regards of heating to 85, please note spores do not die at 85C, but bacteria does. After 24 hours in warm place and surrounded by food, spores germinate into bacteria and are heat treated again to 85C and killed this way. This process is repeated 3rd time to let remaining spores to germinate to bacteria to be killed during 3rd heating to 85C. This way is still being used in some food industries for sterilization as some products can not withstand 121C.

      I will be trying to sterilize as soon as possible, but I still have hopes for tyndallization as it will not require additional machinery. I understand that sterilization is far more superior in comparing to other methods, but tyndallization used to be used instead of sterilization and when done right can achieve very similar results.
      Thanks for your response.

      Today was 24 hours for tyndallizied jars in 37C and we are sending them to the lab to see what is killed and what is not. in two more days we will send some more jars to the lab and so on for a week.

      Kommentar


        #4
        Hello again,

        we talk about self stable products. So the quality must be stable about 3-6 months, without coldness.
        I'm sure you will kill the most of microorganisms with tyndallization. But even not all. That is the risc.
        One alternative is the high-pressure process. But this process is very expensive and you need very big machines. It's only a method for food-industry. And it's doesn't function with glass, only with PA/PE films or without packaging.
        Sorry, thats all of my knowledge.
        Liebe Grüße

        Jürgen Huber
        Huber Consult e.K.

        Metzgermeister,
        Betriebswirt d. Hdw.
        staatl. gepr. Fleischtechniker
        REFA-Prozessorganisator
        Unternehmercoach
        Fachberater für die Fleischwirtschaft

        www.fleischer-beratung.de

        Kommentar

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